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Population pyramid
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Download and re-use data associated with the stacked bar plots as a *csv or *txt file. Data shows the composition of the population by place of birth (Spanish-born vs foreign-born) for the selected municipality between 2000 and 2016. Attention: UTF-8 encoding and dot as decimal separator.

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Population by place of birth
Foreign-born population by region of birth
Foreign-born population by country of birth
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Population is grouped by region of birth (Spain, Latin-America, Western Europe*, Eastern Europe*, Africa, Asia and others*.)

*Western Europe includes: Germany, Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Norway, Netherlands, Portugal, United Kingdom, San Marino, Sweden, Switzerland, Vatican City.

*Eastern Europe includes: Albania, Armenia, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Slovenia, Estonia, Georgia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Slovak Republic, Czech Republic, Russia, Serbia and Montenegro, Macedonia Ukraine and Cyprus.

*Others: those people who could not prove their place of birth when they registered at the municipality.

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Download and re-use data associated with the map as a *csv or *txt file. Attention: UTF-8 encoding and dot as decimal separator.

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Residential Segregation 2000-2016:

Explore the evolution of two residential segregation indexes (Dissimilarity and Isolation) for different population groups between 2000 and 2016. A line chart with the number of census tracts of the selected municipality is provided in order to facilitate the interpretation of the observed trends.

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Download and re-use data associated with the line plots as a *csv or *txt file. Data shows the evolution of dissimilarity and isolation indexes of different migrant groups (born in Latin-America, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Africa and Asia) for the selected municipality between 2000 and 2016. Attention: UTF-8 encoding and dot as decimal separator.

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Dissimilarity index
Isolation index
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Methodology

Residential segregation can be defined in general terms as the degree to which two or more groups of populations live separated from each other in a shared physical space (neighbourhood, municipality, province). Here we present the evolution of the dissimilarity and isolation indexes for five different foreign-born groups at the municipal level. The first of these indexes of residential segregation shows the degree of shared space between two population groups. The score of the dissimilarity can be simply interpreted as the percentage of the foreign-born population that should have changed their place of residence in the province of reference in order to replicate the spatial distribution of the Spanish-born population. In the case of the isolation index the resulting value can be interpreted as the probability of whether, when two people in the reference municipality are taken randomly, they would belong to the same group. The formulas for the dissimilarity and isolation indexes can be expressed as follows: $$D=\frac{1}{2}{\sum_{i =1}\Bigl\lvert\frac{x_i}{X}-\frac{y_i}{Y}\lvert}*100$$ $$P^*=\sum_{i =1}\frac{x_i}{X}*\frac{y_i}{t_i}*100$$

Where x is the population of the X type within the i area, e.g. census tracts; y is the population of the type Y within the i area, X is the total X population of the large geographic entity for which the index is being calculated, Y is the total Y population of the large geographic entity for which the index is being calculated and t is the total population of the i area. The indexes are multiplied by 100 to facilitate interpretation of the results.

Reference:

Duncan, D. & Duncan, B. (1955), A Methodological Analysis of Segregation Indexes, American Sociological Review, Vol. 20, 210-217.

Lieberson, S. (1981), An asymmetrical approach to segregation . In C. Peach, V. Robinson, & S. Smith, editors, Ethnic Segregation in the Cities. London: Croom Helm, 61-82.

Massey, D. & Denton, N. (1988) The Dimensions of Residential Segregation. Social Forces, Vol. 67, 281-315.

Note:

Population is grouped by region of birth (Spain, Latin-America, Western Europe*, Eastern Europe*, Africa, Asia and others*.)

*Western Europe includes: Germany, Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Norway, Netherlands, Portugal, United Kingdom, San Marino, Sweden, Switzerland, Vatican City.

*Eastern Europe includes: Albania, Armenia, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Slovenia, Estonia, Georgia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Slovak Republic, Czech Republic, Russia, Serbia and Montenegro, Macedonia Ukraine and Cyprus.

*Others: residual category that groups those people who could not prove their place of birth when they registered at the municipality.

Population Diversity 2000-2016:

Explore the evolution of two diversity indexes (Simpson and entropy computed over 6 population groups) of each municipality between 2000 and 2016. The mean diversity of Spain is plotted by default.